Japanese Illustrator Imagines A World Where Humans Live Among Giant Animals


This mysterious Japanese artist, who goes by the pseudonym of Ariduka55 on social media channels, creates otherwordly illustrations that breathe life into a completely new fantasy world where giant animals live and evolve alongside humans. These illustrations are inspired by our ordinary world with the exception that the little animals – cats, dogs, rabbits, owls, raccoons – are close in size to a three-storey building.

It seems the artist likes to indulge himself with illustrations that depict soft and cuddly animals – pandas, rabbits, dogs and the like – although, it's pretty evident that the cats are the apples of the artist's eye. The atmosphere in the pictures is almost always etherial and peaceful, complete with story-telling elements in their compositions. Many of the illustrations are marked with soft sunshine filtering through various objects, including leaves and windows.

Fun fact, the Japanese even have a word for sunlight streaming through the leaves of the trees – komorebi (木漏れ日). It's a term for a light curtain and the shadow it creates on the ground, a term that eloquently describes this everyday beauty.

You can buy your very own work by Ariduka55 by going HERE.

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    The art of camouflage is on point in this picture. Not only did the black cat become one with nature, it even managed to find a blue blob friend while at it. We are not sure why (perhaps because of the big round eyed), this cat reminds us of Totoro by Ghibli studio.

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    A world where you can surrender yourself to sleep on a giant ball of fur is a world where you wouldn't be able to get any work done. A perfect world.

    Fun fact: did you know that in traditional Japanese architecture, a door, window or room divider made of translucent paper over a frame of wood is called shōji? It probably all comes down to the Japanese love for minimalism, for the purpose of shōji doors is to slide open, and thus conserve space that would be otherwise required for a swinging door.

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    A tranquil and slightly gloomy part of the series featuring a Korean crow-tit (Baepsae). There is a common idiom/saying: 'the crow tit will break its legs trying to walk like a stork', which, in its simplest form, means pretending to be something you are not.

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    This looks straight out of a science-fiction movie where the main protagonist is a stray cat looking for a place to call home. For months, locals have tried to lure the kitten out of his hiding place promising toys and treats. 'Look, this ain't a laser pointer, but at least it's shiny.'

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    This black feline is a show off who likes to put his excellent abilities on display. 'You can't do that, human, can you?' - he says with a challenging look on his face, while making a perfect pyramid formation with a huge ball of cotton and a blue blob of a bird.

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    A girl comes back home and uses a HUG card on her cat, but this non-exploding kitten combats the girl's futile attempt at physical contact with a NOPE card of his own.

    The Japanese have a daily expression 'tadaima' (ただいま) which is a shortened version of 'I just came home', and while usually it is polite to respond with 'okaeri' (おかえり) i.e. 'welcome home', this giant feline will have none of it.

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    An unlikely hero was on his way to slay a villainous wizard, when suddenly a wild menacing fur ball of shadow crossed his path. Contrary to much of the Western world, Japanese culture sees a black cat crossing your path as a good omen. In fact, black cats are generally seen as good luck in Japan and much of Asia.

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