Photographer Spends 6 Months In Siberia Capturing Photographs of Siberia’s Indigenous People


Three years ago, photographer Alexander Khimushin commenced his latest project titled ‘The World In Faces’ that would celebrate beauty and diversity of the world through the portraits of ordinary people. Since this time he has taken thousands of portraits all over the world.

In the last six months, his project focussed on the indigenous people of Siberia. An enormous region, Siberia is almost double the size of Australia and 30% larger than the United States, Canada or the whole Europe. Siberia is one of the world’s last frontiers of the unknown. Everyone has probably heard that it is very cold and sparsely populated there, but what do we know about the people living there?

During Alexander’s half-a-year-long solo journey across Siberia, he covered 25,000 km to visit many remote locations: from lake Baikal shores to the coast of Japan sea, from endless steppes of Mongolia to the coldest place on Earth – Yakutia. All with only one mission – to capture faces and traditions of various groups of indigenous people living there. While some of the ethnic groups are dominant in their regions, many others are on the edge of disappearance, with a total population as low as only a hundred people left. They remain largely unknown to the outside world.

Here are some of the results of that journey. Let us know what are your favorites!

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